Guest Question-6

This one is from Logik. Connect.

1.5_12. 5_2

3.5_3 4.5_4

Cracked by Rithwick and Vikram.

ANSWER: Lecoq named the element “gallia” after his native land of France. It was later claimed that, in one of those multilingual puns so beloved of men of science in the early 19th century, he had also named gallium after himself, as his name, “Le coq,” is the French for “the rooster,” and the Latin for “rooster” is “gallus”; however, in an 1877 article Le coq denied this supposition. (The supposition was also noted in Building Blocks of the Universe, a book on the elements by Isaac Asimov.)

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2 thoughts on “Guest Question-6

  1. Rithwik says:

    Gallium (Visual 2) was discovered by Lecoq de Boisbaudran (Visual 3) in 1875. He named the element “gallia” after his native land of Gaul, or France (Visual 2). It was later claimed that he had also named gallium after himself, as his name, “Le coq,” is the French for “the rooster,”(visual-4) and the Latin for “rooster” is “gallus”.

  2. Vikram says:

    Gallium

    1. 31 electrons around a nucleus – Gallium atom (At. no. 31)

    2. A chunk of Gallium

    3. LeCoq de Boisbaudran, the discoverer

    4. le coq, a rooster, indicating a rumored pun in naming it gallium, considering gallus is rooster in Latin

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