Inescapable

In Mark Waid’s “Irredeemable” Scylla and Charybdis are a superhero duo with “twin powers” much like Hawk and Dove from DC. Their names however, are taken from a Greek Mythology.

According to Homer, they were mythical sea monsters. Later Greek tradition sited them on opposite sides of the Strait of Messina between Sicily and the Italian mainland. Scylla was rationalized as a rock shoal (described as a six-headed sea monster) on the Italian side of the strait and Charybdis was a whirlpool off the coast of Sicily. They were located close enough to each other that they posed an inescapable threat to passing sailors.

What modern phrase could be attributed to them?

Claim to Fame

Have you read “The Moon is a Harsh Mistress”? In it,the lunar colony is maintained by a High-optional, logical, multi-evaluating supervisor, which is affectionally called Mike by the hero. This is in reference to another character who is admittedly the more brilliant but lazy brother of a famous character from another franchise. He became the head of British intelligence in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and was called ‘M’ as a nod to Ian Fleming’s works. Who am I talking about?

I _________ you this question

Hold on to your short attention spans. This is gonna be a lot of reading.
The answers of all these questions are connected. Give the connection too.
Question 1
Dr. X is a fictional character introduced in a series of novels by British author Sax Rohmer. It was also featured extensively in cinema, television, radio, comic strips and comic books for over 90 years, and has become an archetype of the evil criminal genius. It  became a stereotype often associated with the Yellow Peril and has inspired numerous other characters like Ming the Merciless, Dr. No, Dr. Zin from the Jonny Quest, Dr. Yen-Lo from The Manchurian Candidate, Lo-Pan from Big Trouble in Little China, Marvel Comics foe the Mandarin, DC Comics’ Rā’s al Ghūl.
Id X.
Question 2
“I told you ’bout the X and me, man
You know that we’re as close as can be, man
Well, here’s another clue for you all;
The X was Paul”!
                                      — The Beatles, “Glass Onion”
Glass Onion consists almost entirely of cryptic shout outs to the group’s earlier songs.
 John Lennon was so fed up with fans trying to find hidden allusions in their songs that he decided to write a completely nonsensical one. Lennon allegedly said, “Let’s see the fuckers figure that one out” after finishing it. Which, in an ironic twist, was still searched for “clues“.
What is X in the lyrics?
Question 3
When kept as a talisman, a X is said to bring good luck. Many believe that to hang it with the ends pointing upwards is good luck as it acts as a storage container of sorts for any good luck that happens to be floating by, whereas to hang it with the ends pointing down, is bad luck as all the good luck will fall out. Others believe that it should be hung the other way, as it will then release its luck to the people around it.
A stylized variation of the X is used for a popular throwing game, Xs.
Superstitious sailors believe nailing a X to the mast will help their vessel avoid storms.
It also lends its name to a species of crabs.
Question 4
U.S.   World
#1      B
#2      _ _
#2½   F
#3      H
#4      2H
The one left blank is a giveaway.What common item can be bought in these varieties?
Question 5
William Addis of England is believed to have produced the first mass-produced X in 1780.In 1770 he had been jailed for causing a riot; while in prison he took a small animal bone, drilled small holes in it, obtained some bristles from a guard, tied them in tufts, passed the tufts through the holes on the bone, and glued them. He soon became very rich. He died in 1808, and left the business to his eldest son, also called William; the company continues to this day under the name of Wisdom Xs. Pig hair was used for cheaper Xs, and badger hair for the more expensive ones.
What common item’s origin has been described above?
Question 6
Ape hanger
Z
Beach
Clip-ons
Clubman
Cruiser
Buckhorn
Drag
Motocross
Types of what?